Caring for one another: 10 things you can do to show you care

Credits: Bible.com / (C) ThinkTalk

Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around.

Leo Buscaglia

In a world where everyone is in a rush, where everything needed to have been done and completed yesterday, and where microwaving is preferred to stoving, it takes a real human to pause and care for another.

Most of us don’t pause to know who our neighbor is. I once lived in a neighborhood where it took damage to my neighbor’s fence for her to acknowledge that she had someone living next door. We had been neighbors for six years and never saw each other though I attempted to introduce myself a few times to no avail! I know it sounds ridiculous … I could have ignored her when she finally came knocking, but I seized the opportunity to express my feelings. Happens that she’s a registered nurse (RN) and works the night shift; so our days/times were anti.

Still no excuses – six years is a long time. We can either justify or be intentional about caring. When we justify why we can’t, guess what, we will never. But, it is greatly appreciated when one steps out to care despite one’s busy schedule,

. . .

It really doesn’t take much to check on one another. It’s both humane and a great safety measure. For example, I will not be able to differentiate between an intruder and a true guest if I did not know who my neighbor is. We’ve heard incidents happen that otherwise could have been averted had folks stopped to care.

Yes, you have projects that need to be completed;
Yes, you need to fulfill that mega-dollar contract; and,
Yes, you’re on the go for the next (fill-in-the-blank),
But, before you set off, let someone know that you care and love them. You might just put a smile on their face and hope in their heart.

This is particularly essential for children. A hug, caring eyes, a smile, look that shows that they are the most important to you, is paramount for their development, helps build up their self esteem, and grounds them securely in the knowledge of who they are.

There are tons of ways that we can care, but here are my top Ten (10).

  1. A hug. My daughter told me that a 22-second hug releases endorphins 😊 This was confirmed by Healthline (https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-increase-endorphins) “When released, endorphins can help relieve pain, reduce stress, and may cause a euphoric feeling. In short, they can make you feel pretty darn good.”
  2. A smile costs the giver nothing but is everything to the receiver.
  3. Saying “I love you” should never be rationed nor justified. Because you said it in the morning doesn’t mean that you must withhold it at night, or yesterday and withhold tomorrow. Neither should love ever be justified. Love just because!
  4. Listen with intent to understand. Everyone likes to talk, but it takes the special few to actively listen. Be one of those special fews.
  5. Affirm - your love, loyalty, support, etc. daily.
  6. A phone call. Pick up your phone and make the call instead of texting. Hearing the voice gladdens the heart that no texting can replicate.
  7. A note - slip one into your children’s bag or a book (or Bible) that you know they’ll read on that day or in your significant other’s jacket or wallet.
  8. Send occasional flowers or plants without waiting for a special occasion such as anniversary or birthdays.
  9. Order a meal or two for delivery to your loved one(s). This gives them a break and is appreciated more during Covid-19.
  10. Do random acts of kindness; for example, offer to run an errand for them, walk with them or walk their dog, help take their children out to the park or to watch a movie.

Many display love and caring only after a person is gone (as in dead!). Let’s display the affections now, in the present. Who knows – it might just extend the lives of our loved ones.

I’ll end with

Beginning today, treat everyone you meet as if they were going to be dead by midnight. Extend to them all the care, kindness and understanding you can muster, and do it with no thought of any reward. Your life will never be the same again.

Og Mandino

Love & Peace!

8 Comments

  1. NDA, I agree to a certain degree that anti-receptivity does, and should, not stop one from caring. That should be the case with one’s family; particularly spouse and children. However when it comes to others, and certain cultures, it may be misconstrued as harassment (the act to disturb or bother persistently; torment, as with troubles or cares; pester; dictionary.com). One does not stop caring, but should step back and give the person space, till they come around. In my post, I stopped knocking on my neighbor’s door. What would you have done?

    Liked by 1 person

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